Technology and artificial intelligence are changing dermatology

Mirror, mirror, my... well, you certainly know that story. Who has never been hypnotized in front of a mirror noticing the smallest details; wrinkles, time marks... If there is still no magic for rejuvenation, at least this mirror plays the real thing with you. Using artificial intelligence and visual computing, HiMirror has a built-in camera capable of real-time skin analysis. The sincere mirror looks for expression marks, wrinkles, red spots, dehydration and more...

Unfortunately, the smart mirror is not yet available in Brazil. To buy, for the time being, only in the United States. But calm down, around here, modern dermatological clinics already offer similar equipment, to this one. It is not a mirror, but by placing the face there, the equipment emits two different types of light to make a complete diagnosis of facial tissue and suggest the best products and treatments for each case.

Year after year, innovative technologies emerge for the world of beauty. From new substances in the segment, through more modern treatments to increasingly hi-tech devices. If a few years ago the aesthetic treatment was almost synonymous with suffering and pain and, worse, with long-term results. Now, with the use of technology, the success of treatments is greater, less painful and faster too...

Another treatment that has become more comfortable thanks to technology is this one that combats skin flaccidity. Through radiofrequency, the equipment emits heat waves that deeply heat the treated area. The technology used stimulates the production of collagen and elastin in the abdominal area, reducing the flaccidity of the region. Interesting is that, on the surface, the equipment does not even heat or bother the patient.

But at the same time as the equipment evolves, the professional also needs to be updated and, especially, familiar with the use of these machines. Solutions like these in the hands and bad professionals can offer serious risks to users...

Brazil is not far behind more developed countries in aesthetic technology. But, of course, there's something that hasn't gotten here yet. Similar to the photographic analysis of the face that you saw at the beginning of this article, there is already a kind of body scanner complete with the power to detect skin cancer early. Another technology applied to dermatology that hasn't arrived yet is 3D printing. In Madrid, Spain, scientists from the Spanish University Carlos III, presented a prototype of a 3D bioprinter capable of creating a fully functional human skin. In the United States, students from the Wake Forest School of Medicine also developed a similar prototype that can print equally functional synthetic skin.

If we haven't yet discovered the rejuvenation formula, one certainty is that technology, with increasingly modern methods and new substances, promises to leave wrinkles, stains and marks for much later...